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Integrating Pinterest into the Trunk Club experience

Client: Trunk Club

Role: Product Design

Project Background As an intern of Trunk Club during the Summer of 2016, I was given the opportunity to pair with a product designer (👋 Maya) on integrating Pinterest into the Trunk Club experience. I learned that the idea came from one of our engineers (Jason Kaskel), who wanted to see if it’d be possible to utilize the Pinterest API during a hack day project.

Projects like these sprout continuously from the entire company to try and think of better and more efficient ways to capture new users’ style preferences and needs. For this project, we tried to frame it around this problem: How might Trunk Club make it easy for customers to share their style inspiration with their stylist?

Our hypotheses was that by reducing the friction to share style inspiration with stylists, it would increase customer engagement and other metrics like the amount of items kept from the trunk. Interestingly, we also found a good number of conversations where customers were already sharing links and screenshots of their Pinterest boards, which further validated the purpose of this project.

sketches

Ideation Our hypotheses was that by reducing the friction to share style inspiration with stylists, it would increase customer engagement and other metrics like the amount of items kept from the trunk. Interestingly, we also found a good number of conversations where customers were already sharing links and screenshots of their Pinterest boards, which further validated the purpose of this project.

The main form of communication within the digital Trunk Club experience is through our messaging platform, so we decided that the flow for sharing style boards and pins would be through the message thread between a customer and a stylist. Therefore, we chose to embed the main entry point of the feature into the compose bar. We also had internal design reviews with other designers, engineers, and product managers to make sure our flow would make sense within the Trunk Club ecosystem.

final design

Testing The main form of testing the feature was through hallway usability testing with other Trunk Club employees. Our users validated that sharing style boards and pins from our messaging platform via the Pinterest icon in the compose bar was natural and intuitive. With this feedback, we went back to iterate and flesh out cross platform flows of the Pinterest integration.

Results After the launch of Pinterest, our results showed a 25% increase in conversion rate for customers that connected their Pinterest accounts, which greatly exceeded our predictions of a 1.3% increase.

What I learned

Edge cases: I was very used to designing in a school-environment where we only had to think about the happy path. I realized that there are a variety of real-world scnearios that I had to take into account and design for instead of assuming the user would take the happy path.

Reflection Looking back, I think we could have collected more feedback on the design, especially from stylists. Many of the features and tools we build for our customers impact our stylists and their workflow because of the close relationship between a stylist and their customers. I believe we could have communicated more with stylists on how this might affect their workflow and what we could do to try and integrate it into their workflow as seamlessly as possible.